WAR TALKS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS (PAPER)

WAR TALKS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS (PAPER)

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George S. Bernard’s War Talks of Confederate Veterans is an indispensable source of information on the Petersburg Campaign of 1864-1865. In particular the compilation is notable for the accounts provided by the former Confederates about the Battle of the Crater and the early weeks of the campaign. Bernard himself had served as a Sergeant in the 12th Virginia Infantry Regiment of Brigadier General William Mahone’s Brigade and clearly wished to make sure that his former comrades-in-arms received the recognition for their actions he felt they deserved.

It should go without saying that the passage of nearly thirty years affected how some men looked back on the war, but, for the most part, the reminiscences present in the book have a strong ring of authenticity.

Everyone interested in the Petersburg Campaign and the role of the common soldier should welcome having War Talks of Confederate veterans in print again.

-Arthur W. Bergeron, Jr.
Pamplin Historical Park & The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

Other books by BERNARD, GEORGE S.

THE VICKSBURG CAMPAIGN - VOLUME 1 (CLOTH)

THE VICKSBURG CAMPAIGN – VOLUME 1 (CLOTH)

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The author provides an exhaustive account of the fighting for the Mississippi’s primary fortress. The 3 volumes trace Grant’s strategy for capturing Vicksburg and the unfolding siege from November 1862 to the city’s fall. Bearss supplies a condensed version of the O.R. (q.v.) that readers can digest, although a number of other sources are also employed. Although analysis and interpretation are sparse, details of many actions–not all of them important–are abundant, often to a miniscule level.

Excerpt from Eicher, Civil War in Books

Other books by BEARSS. EDWIN COLE

GRAPPLING WITH DEATH (CLOTH)

GRAPPLING WITH DEATH (CLOTH)

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This is the story of the hospital of the Union Second Corps. In a time period that we look back on with aghast dismay, where “laudable pus” and hospital fevers were the norm, when antisepsis and microbes were totally unknown, this hospital had an incredible 86.6% survival rate following the battle of Gettysburg! In spite of enormous, almost overwhelming, difficulties, the Second Corps hospitals succeeded because of the tough, compassionate dedication of its surgeons, and the selfless sacrifices of a small group of volunteers, men and women who cared enough to come to a town that could be smelled from miles away as dead men and animals began to decompose in the sweltering summer heat.

To understand these hospitals, one must know something of the lives of the soldiers, surgeons, and civilians that met there. To study their stories, one must also be somewhat familiar with the battle that brought them together, for it was, for many, the defining point of their lives. For some, where (and often more importantly how) they were wounded served as the deciding factor between life and death.

This, then, is the story of the personnel of the Union Second Corps hospital, as they grappled with death before, during, and after the bloody battle of Gettysburg.

–from the Foreword by Roland Maust

Other books by MAUST, ROLAND

HISTORY OF THE 16TH MICHIGAN INFANTRY (CLOTH)

HISTORY OF THE 16TH MICHIGAN INFANTRY (CLOTH)

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“…Where the black smoke of battle rolled heaviest,” said Edwin Hill of the 16th Michigan Infantry Regiment, “there could the 16th be found.”

For decades, students of the Civil War have been able to read histories of other famous regiments that served with the 16th Michigan in the Army of the Potomac— the 83rd Pennsylvania, the 44th New York and the 20th Maine. From the siege of Yorktown to Second Bull Run and Fredericksburg on to the final confrontation with Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House, Hill’s regiment served with these commands in one of the most notable brigades in the Union army.

Yet the 16th Michigan became known as one of the most controversial regiments of the Civil War for the lingering questions over the conduct of its commander, Lt. Col. Norval Welch, in the battle considered the turning point of the war—the struggle for a rocky hill called Little Round Top at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863.

Here is the narrative history of the 16th Michigan, from its formation as Stockton’s Independent Regiment on through its service in the Eastern Theater of the war, beginning in the spring of 1861when Col. Thomas B.W. Stockton, attempting to answer the direct call of President Abraham Lincoln, found his path to command a state regiment blocked by Michigan Governor Austin Blair.

Also presented is the previously untold story of the ill-fated Michigan Lancer Regiment, and how nearly 200 men who had originally wanted to fight in the manner of knights of old ended up in Stockton’s command. Recounted too is the regiment’s role in the nightmarish battles that took place in darkness at Gaines’ Mill, Fredericksburg and Laurel Hill at Spotsylvania Court House, and in daylight attacks and charges across open ground at the Second Battle of Bull Run and Peeble’s Farm.

Not all the collisions involving the leadership of the 16th Michigan took place on the battlefield. The story of the regiment also involves the ambition and personality conflict, intrigue and courts-martial, and the struggle between Stockton and Welch for control of the regiment itself,

But mainly this is the story of soldiers—volunteers from small towns, farmers, grocers and dry goods clerks—youths like George Sidman from Owosso and George Ervay from Grand Ledge, teenaged boys who didn’t want to miss what they felt would be a great adventure; of bright young men, like Frank Keeler from Saginaw, John Barry from the Upper Peninsula and sharpshooter Alfred Apted from Grand Rapids.

For Col. Tom Stockton, veteran, West Point graduate and uncle to Gen. James Longstreet, C.S.A, war was a family affair. Stockton would face his famous nephew at Gaines’ Mill and Fredericksburg and here, in his own words, is the story of how Longstreet’s family helped see to his needs while a prisoner of war in Richmond.

On the march, in camp and in battle, the words and experiences of Charles Salter of Detroit tell of a serious young man who had worked in his father’s grocery but found himself a junior officer responsible for the lives of others, trying to live as Christian as army life allowed. Contrasting are the decidedly more cynical views of Marion Munson from Oakland County, who has little use for his officers, the U.S. Congress and President Lincoln himself.

And here is an examination of the regiment’s terrible hand-to-hand, point blank combat on the exposed face of Little Round Top; the heretofore untold experience of its skirmishers away on the left of their brigade line; and the true story of their role in the historic battle of Gettysburg.

This book completes Morningside’s coverage of Vincent’s Brigade, or the Little Roundtop Regiments-44th New York, 20th Maine, 83rd Pennsylvania, and now the 16th Michigan.

Other books by KIM CRAWFORD

Gettysburg Magazine

Gettysburg Magazine

Gettysburg Magazine

ISSUE NUMBER 16

January 1997
  • The Flying Brigade: Brig. Gen. George Stannard and the Road to Gettysburg by Christopher C. Dickson.
  • Wasted Gallantry: Hood’s Texas Brigade at Gettysburg by Daniel M. Laney.
  • The 7th New Jersey in the Gettysburg Campaign by Paul J. Lader.
  • “The Terrible Impetuosity:” The Pennsylvania Reserves at Gettysburg by Jeffrey F. Sherry.
  • Personal Battle Weapons of the Civil War: Capt. George F. Tait and the 10th New York Zouaves Encounter “Pickett’s Charge” by Wiley Sword.
  • Dr. Billy’s Battles by Roger Long.
  • Stuart’s and Gregg’s Cavalry Engagement, July 3, 1863 by David L. and Audrey J. Ladd.
  • Merritt’s Regulars on South Cavalry Field: Oh, What Could Have Been by Eric J. Wittenberg.
  • Gettysburg’s Last Surviving Soldier: James Marion Lurvey by Jay S. Hoar.

Single issue price is $7.95 ($10.95 by mail). We have published 2,056 pages in 16 issues without advertising—the issues contain nothing but text, photos, and maps. Nothing has ever been attempted on this scale on a single battle before. All back issues #1-15 are available for $4.95 each (plus shipping) until July 1st when they will increase to $7.95. Each is 124-132 pages and introduced by Civil War historian Edwin C. Bearss.

All back issues are available.

If you would like to see an article from the Gettysburg Magazine, please visit the Gettysburg Discussion Group.

ISSUE NUMBER 1

  • “Guts and Good Leadership: The Action at the Railroad Cut, July 1, 1863” by D. Scott Hartwig.
  • “The Defense of McPherson’s Ridge” by D. Scott Hartwig.
  • “Three Flags at Gettysburg” by Alan Nolan.
  • “With the Iron Brigade Guard at Gettysburg” by Lt. Loyd C. Harris, 6th Wisconsin Infantry, edited by Lance J. Herdegen and William J. K. Beaudot.
  • “Berdan’s Sharpshooters at Gettysburg” by Roy Marcot.
  • “A Letter of Oliver W. Norton.” Edited by James R. Wright.
  • “The Supreme Moment In Its Existence – The 140th New York on Little Round Top” by Brian Bennett.
  • “Our Principal Loss was in this Place, Action at the Slaughter Pen and at south end of Houck’s Ridge, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 2 July, 1863” by Kathleen Georg Harrison.
  • “Their Supreme Moment: Barksdale’s Brigade at Gettysburg” by Terrence J. Winschel.
  • “Action on the Emmitsburg Road, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2, 1863” by John Heiser.
  • “J. E. B. Stuart and Gettysburg” by Paul R. Gorman.
  • “The Battle of Hunterstown, Pennsylvania, July 2, 1863” by Paul M. Shevchuk.
  • “Cut to Pieces: The Cavalry Fight at Fairfield, Pennsylvania, July 3rd, 1863” by Paul M. Shevchuk.
  • “The Gettysburg Campaign after Pickett’s Charge” by Dr. Harry W. Pfanz.
  • “General Isaac R. Trimble in Captivity” by Roger Long.

ISSUE NUMBER 2

  • “Part 1: Heavy Was Their Loss: Joe Davis’ Brigade at Gettysburg” by Terrence J. Winschel.
  • “Old Soldiers and War Talk-The Controversy Over the Opening Infantry Fight at Gettysburg” by Lance J. Herdegen.
  • “Here Was Made Out Our Last and Hopeless Stand-the ‘Lost’ Gettysburg Reports of the Nineteenth Indiana” by Alan D. Gaff.
  • “The 11th Army Corps on July 1, 1863 – ‘The Unlucky 11th ‘ ” by D. Scott Hartwig.
  • “Time on Little Round Top” by James R. Wright.
  • “Effects of Marksmanship-A Lesson from Gettysburg” by John J. Pullen.
  • “The Fight for Brinkerhoff’s Ridge, July 2, 1863” by Paul M. Shevchuk.
  • “Paper Collars: Stannard’s Brigade at Gettysburg” by Tony L. Trimble.
  • “The 1st Texas Infantry and the Repulse of Farnsworth’s Charge” by Paul M. Shevchuk.
  • “The Confederate Prisoners of Gettysburg” by Roger Long.
  • “The Removal of the Confederate Dead at Gettysburg” by Edward G. J. Richter.
  • “Black Glory: Our Afro-American Civil War Old-Soldiery” by Jay S. Hoar.

ISSUE NUMBER 3

  • “Gettysburg’s Preview of War: Early’s June 25, 1863, Raid” by Linda J. Black.
  • “The Signal Corps at Gettysburg” by Col. Bill Cameron.
  • The Supreme Moment In Its Existence – The 140th New York on Little Round Top” by Brian Bennett.
  • “Caldwell Clears the Wheatfield” by Eric Campbell.
  • “The Wounding of Albert Jenkins, July 2, 1863” by Paul M. Shevchuk.
  • “To Gain a Second Star: The Forgotten George S. Greene” by Wayne E. Motts.
  • “Part II : Heavy Was Their Loss: Joe Davis’ Brigade at Gettysburg” by Terrence L. Winschel.
  • “A Rendezvous at Gettysburg: Identification of a Group of Unknown Dead” by Earl J. Coates.
  • “Wasted Valor: The Confederate Dead at Gettysburg” by Gregory A. Coco.
  • “The Indiana Relief Effort at Gettysburg” by Alan D. Gaff.
  • “John B. Bachelder: Government Historian at the Battle of Gettysburg” by Richard Allen Sauers.

ISSUE NUMBER 4

  • “Part 1: Posey’s Brigade at Gettysburg” by Terrence J. Winschel.
  • “Francis Asbury Wallar: A Medal of Honor at Gettysburg” by William J. K. Beaudot.
  • “A Mississippian in the Railroad Cut” by Roger Long.
  • “The Lieutenant Who Arrested a General” by Lance J. Herdegen.
  • “Rodes On Oak Hill: A Study of Rodes’ Division on the First Day of Gettysburg” by Massy Griffin.
  • “Dilger’s Battery at Gettysburg” by Kenneth M. Kepf.
  • “The Lost Hours of ‘JEB’ Stuart” by Paul M. Shevchuk.
  • “Forgotten Field: The Cavalry Battle East of Gettysburg on July 3, 1963” by Marshall D. Krolick.
  • “It Struck Horror To Us All” by D. Scott Hartwig.
  • “The Signal Corps at Gettysburg Part II: Support of Meade’s Pursuit” by Col. Bill Cameron.
  • “The Confederate Signal Corps at Gettysburg” by David Winfred Gaddy.
  • “Gettysburg Controversy” by Richard A. Sauers.
  • “Attack and Counterattack.”

ISSUE NUMBER 5

  • “A. P. Hill’s Advance to Gettysburg” by Douglas Craig Haines.
  • “The Death of Iverson’s Brigade” by Gerard A. Patterson
  • “The Deadly Embrace: The Meeting of the Twenty-fourth Regiment, Michigan Infantry and the Twenty-sixth Regiment of North Carolina Troops at McPherson’s Woods, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 1, 1863” by R. Lee Hadden
  • “Kershaw’s Brigade at Gettysburg” by Mac Wyckoff.
  • “Baptism of Fire: The Ninth Massachusetts Battery at Gettysburg, July, 2, 1863” by Eric Campbell.
  • “The First Minnesota at Gettysburg” by Robert W. Meinhard.
  • “Posey’s Brigade at Gettysburg, Part II ” by Terrence J. Winschel.
  • “Pickett’s Charge: The Reason Why” by Henry J. Greenberg.
  • “The Death and Burials of General Richard Brooke Garnett” by Stephen Davis.
  • “The Effects of Artillery Fire on Infantry at Gettysburg” by Thomas L. Elmore.
  • “Reunion at Gettysburg” by Elizabeth Lewis.
  • “Attack and Counterattack.”

ISSUE NUMBER 6

  • “War Comes to Professor Michael Jacobs” by Linda G. Black.
  • “Through Blood And Fire At Gettysburg” by Joshua L. Chamberlain
  • “Skirmishers” by Thomas L. Elmore.
  • “Shadow Passing: The Tragic Story of Norval Welch and the Sixteenth Michigan at Gettysburg and Beyond” by John Michael Gibney.
  • “Humbugging the Historian: A Reappraisal of Longstreet” by Roger J. Greezicki, Esq.
  • “Black Confederates at Gettysburg-1863” by Richard Rollins.
  • “A Call of Leadership: Lt. Col. Charles Redington Mudge, U.S.V. and the Second Massachusetts at Gettysburg” by Anthony J. Milano.
  • “Turning the Pages of History: A New Draft of the Gettysburg Address Located” by Lloyd Ostendorf
  • “‘What a Deadly Trap We Were In:’ Archer’s Brigade on July 1, 1863″ by Marc and Beth Storch”
  • “Pye’s Sword at the Railroad Cut” by Wiley Sword.
  • “The Colors Are Shrouded in Mystery” by Terrence J. Winschel.
  • “Humphreys’ Division’s Flank March to Little Round Top” by James A. Woods.
  • “The Wounding of Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock” by Steven J. Wright.

ISSUE NUMBER 7

  • “‘Remember Harper’s Ferry !’: The Degradation, Humiliation, and Redemption of Col. George L. Willard’s Brigade, Part I” by Eric A. Campbell.
  • “‘His Left Was Worth a Glance:’ Meade and the Union Left on July 2, 1863” by David B. Downs.
  • “The Attack and Repulse of Steuart’s Brigade on Culp’s Hill” by Thomas L. Elmore.
  • “The Philadelphia Brigade at Gettysburg” by Gary G. Lash.
  • “General Orders Number 72: ‘By Command of Gen. R. E. Lee'” by Roger Long.
  • “Col. Strong Vincent and the Eighty-third Pennsylvania Infantry at Little Round Top” by Kevin O’Brien.
  • “An Iron Brigade Captain’s Revolver in the Fight on McPherson’s Ridge” by Wiley Sword.
  • “Seventy-fifth Anniversary of Gettysburg” by Mark Tooley.
  • “‘Agate:’ Whitelaw Reid Reports from Gettysburg” by Tony L. Trimble.
  • “Twenty-first Mississippi” by Terrence J. Winschel.
  • “A Gettysburg Encounter” by Roger Long.

ISSUE NUMBER 8

  • “The Gordon – Barlow Story, with Sequel” by John J. Pullen.
  • “Captain James Glenn’s Sword and Private J. Marshall Hill’s Enfield in the Fight for the Lutheran Cemetery” by Wiley Sword.
  • “The Hardtack Regiment in the Brickyard Fight” by Mark H. Dunkelman and Michael J. Winey.
  • “The Saviors of Little Round Top” by Col. Alexander W. Cameron.
  • “Gettysburg and the 17th Maine” by William Barnes Jordan, Jr.
  • “Private Robert G. Carter and the 22d Massachusetts at Gettysburg” by Anthony J. Milano.
  • “North Carolina and the Pickett-Pettigrew-Trimble Charge at Gettysburg” by Michael W. Taylor.
  • “‘Remember Harper’s Ferry!’ The Degradation, Humiliation, and Redemption of Col. George L. Willard’s Brigade, Part II ” by Eric Campbell.
  • “The Gettysburg Experience of James J. Kirkpatrick” by Terrence J. Winschel.
  • “Elmina Keeler Spencer: Matron, 147th New York” by E. F. Conklin.

ISSUE NUMBER 9

  • “The March of the 124th New York to Gettysburg” by Gary Lash.
  • “R.S. Ewell’s Command, June 29-July 1” by Douglas Haines.
  • “Pursuing the Elusive ‘Cannoneer'” by Silas Felton
  • “Defending Watson’s Battery” by James A Woods.
  • SERIES: Personal Battle Weapons of the Civil War: “Capt. McKee’s Revolver and Captain Seller’s Sword With Weed’s Brigade at Little Round Top.” by Wiley Sword.
  • “Two Roads to Gettysburg: Thomas Leiper Kane and the 13th Pennsylvania Reserves” by John D. Imhof.
  • “Remembering the 14th Connecticut Volunteers” by John Archer.
  • “‘A Perfect Roar of Musketry:’ Candy’s Brigade in the Fight For Culp’s Hill” by Kevin E. O’Brien.
  • “The Gettysburg Diary of Lieutenant William Peel” by Terrence J. Winschel.
  • “Sixth Michigan Cavalry at Falling Waters: The End of the Gettysburg Campaign” by Gary L. Bush
  • “Three Weeks at Gettysburg” by George Anna Woolsey.
  • “Gettysburg Remembers President Lincoln” by Linda Black.

ISSUE NUMBER 10

  • “Brigadier General Henry Baxter’s Brigade at Gettysburg, July 1” by Gary G. Lash.
  • “Joseph Latimer, The ‘Boy Major’ at Gettysburg” by Jay Jorgensen.
  • “Two New York Swords in the Fight For Culp’s Hill: Colonel James C. Lane’s and Captain Nicholas Grumbach’s” by Wiley Sword and Mike Shotwell.
  • “A Signal Sergeant at Gettysburg: The Diary of Luther C. Furst” by Alexander W. Cameron.
  • “The Union Second Corps Hospital at Gettysburg, July 2 to August 8 , 1863” by Roland R. Maust.
  • “Major Joseph H. Saunders, 33rd North Carolina, C.S.A.” by Roger Long.
  • “Never Heard Before on the American Continent” by Peter S. Carmichael.
  • “Attack and Counterattack.”